Meta-Mirror

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The Meta-Mirror concept was created by inventor and technologist Russell Wright and is a term formally adopted by the Epimemetics Integral Science and Philosophy, founded by Russell in 2011. 

The concept of a Meta-Mirror was inspired by several inventors and scientists encompassing several disciplines.

The following fields of endeavor made the Meta-Mirror technology possible:

Neuroscientist (and Epimemetic hero and iconoclast) VS Ramachandran, and his invention called The Mirror Box
Cognitive Neurobiophycisist and Epimemetic hero and iconoclast) Mark Evan Furman, and his invention called Neuroprinting (see below video).

Quotes by Russell Wright

"The eyeball (ego) cannot see Itself. You need a mirror."

"But just looking at yourself in a mirror will generally lead to Narcissus Syndrome."

"No eyeball(s) can see the totality of itself, individually or subjectively as a group."

"A culture of "reflections" (spiritual groups or otherwise) can offer many social mirrors in order help an individual (eyeball) see different aspects (blind spots) of himself from multiple positions in the room. But such circumstances generally lead to a "Hall of Mirrors" resulting in Group Narcissism or Groupthink due to the limitations of Mirror neurons. Eventually the group eyeball can also no longer see itself either.

"In Reality, a mirror cannot see anything at all . . . so you need a Meta-Mirror."



Nobody really knows what a Meta-Mirror is.

From the position of Radical Deconfabularianism, a True Meta-Mirror is a person who truly Knows What They Do Not Know, and has eradicated every form of Confabulation from all levels of motivational and experiential existence.

The Meta-Mirror is believed by some to be a realized adept or Siddha.

Some people believe psychedelic substances to act as a Meta-Mirror in socially engineered situations.

Others believe that a "NDE" or near death experience can provide an individual eyeball (ego) with a true experience of his Deconfabulated Self.

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